Common Shares

DAILY DATA as of 9/19/14  
Closing Market Price$21.82
Closing NAV$20.29
Premium/(Discount)7.54%
52-week Average Premium/Discount6.00%
Current Distribution Rate110.01%
Monthly Dividend Per Share2$0.18210
Ex-Dividend Date09/11/2014
Payable Date09/30/2014
Daily Volume44,484
52 Week High/Low Market Price$22.65/$20.41
52 Week High/Low NAV$20.61/$20.04
Intraday Trading InformationNYSE
WEEKLY DATA as of 9/19/14  
Closing Market Price$21.82
Closing NAV$20.29
Closing Volume44,484
Premium/(Discount)7.54%
Distribution Rate10.01%
Total Managed Assets$467,322,895
Common Shares Outstanding16,047,986
Percent Leveraged330.32%
52-Week Average Premium/Discount6.00%
SEMI-ANNUAL DATA as of 11/30/13  
Fiscal Year-End5/31
Investment AdviserGuggenheim Funds Investment Advisors, LLC
Portfolio ManagerGuggenheim Partners Investment Management, LLC
Expense Ratio (Common Shares)41.78%
Portfolio Turnover Rate95%

Inception Information

COMMON SHARES  
Inception DateJuly 26, 2007
NYSE SymbolGOF
NAV SymbolXGOFX
The Wall Street Journal ListingClayGuggStratOpps
CUSIP40167F101
Inception Market Price$20.00
Inception NAV$19.10
FINANCIAL LEVERAGE as of 9/19/14
1940 Act Asset Coverage Ratio330%

QUARTERLY TOTAL RETURNS

as of 6/30/14
  MARKET PRICE NAV
2014 YTD 8.34 % 6.86 %
1 Year 10.62 % 12.36 %
3 Year 12.89 % 12.13 %
5 Year 23.49 % 21.94 %
10 Year - -
Since Inception 12.98 % 12.40 %

Performance data quoted represents past performance, which is no guarantee of future results, and current performance may be lower or higher than the figures shown. Since Inception returns assume a purchase of common shares at the initial offering price of $20.00 per share for market price returns or initial net asset value (NAV) of $19.10 per share for NAV returns. Returns for periods of less than one year are not annualized. All distributions are assumed to be reinvested either in accordance with the dividend reinvestment plan (DRIP) for market price returns or NAV for NAV returns. Until the DRIP price is available from the Plan Agent, the market price returns reflect the reinvestment at the closing market price on the last business day of the month. Once the DRIP is available around mid-month, the market price returns are updated to reflect reinvestment at the DRIP price. Performance data reflects fees and expenses of the Fund(s) which includes management and advisory fees, as well as additional expenses.  Please refer to the most recent annual or semi-annual report for additional information.

1 Latest declared distribution per share annualized and divided by the current share price.

2 Distributions may be paid from sources of income other than ordinary income, such as short term capital gains, long term capital gains or return of capital. If a distribution consists of something other than ordinary income, a 19(a) notice detailing the anticipated source(s) of the distribution will be made available. The 19(a) notice will be posted to the Fund’s website and to the Depository Trust & Clearing Corporation so that brokers can distribute such notices to Shareholders of the Fund. Section 19(a) notices are provided for informational purposes only and not for tax reporting purposes. The final determination of the source and tax characteristics of all distributions in 2014 will be made after the end of the year. This information is not legal or tax advice. Consult a professional regarding your specific legal or tax matters.

3 Represents the amount of financial leverage the Fund currently employs as a percentage of total Fund assets.

4 Expense ratios are annualized and reflect the funds operating expense, or in the case of a fund with a fee waiver, net operating expense, as of the most recent annual or semi-annual report.


INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE

The Fund’s investment objective is to maximize total return through a combination of current income and capital appreciation. The Fund will pursue a relative value-based investment philosophy, which utilizes quantitative and qualitative analysis to seek to identify securities or spreads between securities that deviate from their perceived fair value and/or historical norms. The Fund’s sub-adviser seeks to combine a credit managed fixed-income portfolio with access to a diversified pool of alternative investments and equity strategies. The Fund’s investment philosophy is predicated upon the belief that thorough research and independent thought are rewarded with performance that has the potential to outperform benchmark indexes with both lower volatility and lower correlation of returns as compared to such benchmark indexes. The Fund cannot ensure investors that it will achieve its investment objective.

  • the Fund may invest up to 60% of its total assets in income securities rated below investment grade (commonly referred to as "junk bonds");
  • the Fund may invest up to 20% of its total assets in non-U.S. dollar-denominated income securities of corporate and governmental issuers located outside the U.S., including up to 10% in emerging markets;
  • the Fund may invest up to 50% of its total assets in common equity securities consisting of common stock; and
  • the Fund may invest up to 30% of its total assets in investment funds that primarily hold (directly or indirectly) investments in which the Fund may invest directly

The Fund will seek to achieve its investment objective by investing in a wide range of fixed income and other debt and senior equity securities (“Income Securities”) selected from a variety of sectors and credit qualities, including, but not limited to, corporate bonds, loans and loan participations, structured finance investments, U.S. government and agency securities, mezzanine and preferred securities and convertible securities, and in common stocks, limited liability company interests, trust certificates and other equity investments (“Common Equity Securities”) that the Fund’s sub-adviser believes offer attractive yield and/or capital appreciation potential, including employing a strategy of writing (selling) covered call and put options on such equities.

For periodic shareholder reports and recent fund-specific filings, please visit the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) website via the following: http://sec.gov/cgi-bin/browse-edgar?action=getcompany&CIK=0001380936&owner=include&count=40

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Why a Leveraged Fund?

Leveraged closed-end funds offer investors the opportunity to purchase shares of a fund whose dividend yields generally are designed to be higher than those of similar, unleveraged investments. At the same time, leverage introduces or heightens certain investment risks. As a result, understanding leverage, its benefits and risks, plays an important role in determining whether a leveraged Fund is the right investment. Leverage creates risks that may adversely affect the return for the holders of common shares, including: the likelihood of greater volatility of NAV and market price of the Fund’s common shares, fluctuations in the dividend rates, and possible increased operating costs, which may reduce the Fund’s total return.

Describe the differences between closed-end and open-end funds?

An open-end fund may be purchased or sold at NAV, plus sales charge in some cases. An open-end fund will issue new shares when an investor wants to purchases shares in the fund and will sell assets to redeem shares when an investor wants to sell shares. When selling an open-end fund the price the seller receives is established at the close of the market when the NAV is calculated. Unlike the open-end fund, a closed-end fund has a limited number of shares outstanding and trades on an exchange at the market price based on supply and demand. An investor may purchase or sell shares at market price while the exchange is open. The common shares may trade at a discount or premium to the NAV.

What does the "Ex-Div" or the "Ex-Dividend" date refer to?

Every quarter the Fund pays dividends and those investors who purchase the Fund before the ex-dividend date will receive the next dividend distribution. Investors who purchase on or after the ex-dividend date will not receive the next dividend distribution. The value of the dividend is subtracted from the Fund's NAV on the ex-dividend date each quarter. So when the NAV is reported with an "ex-div" behind it, this means that the amount of the dividend has already been taken out of the NAV.

What is the DRIP and how is its price determined?

DRIP is the Dividend Reinvestment Plan. The DRIP price is the cost per share for all participants in the reinvestment plan. The DRIP price is determined by one of two scenarios. One, if the Common Shares are trading at a discount, the DRIP price is the weighted average cost to purchase the Common Shares from the NYSE or elsewhere. Lastly, if the Common Shares are trading at a premium, the DRIP price is the determined either the higher of the NAV or approximately 95% of the Common Share price.

GOF FUND MANAGER

Guggenheim Partners Investment Management, LLC an affiliate of Guggenhiem Partners, LLC

INVESTMENT TEAM

B. Scott Minerd - Managing Partner, Global Chief Investment Officer

Mr. Minerd is Chairman of Investments and Global Chief Investment Officer at Guggenheim. Mr. Minerd guides the firm’s investment strategies and oversees client accounts across a broad range of fixed-income and equity securities. Previously, Mr. Minerd was a Managing Director with Credit Suisse First Boston in charge of trading and risk management for the Fixed Income Credit Trading Group. In this position, he was responsible for the corporate bond, preferred stock, money markets, U.S. government agency and sovereign debt, derivatives securities, structured debt and interest rate swaps trading business units. Prior to that, Mr. Minerd was Morgan Stanley’s London based European Capital Markets Products Trading and Risk Manager responsible for Eurobonds, Euro-MTNs, domestic European Bonds, FRNs, derivative securities and money market products in 12 European currencies and Asian markets. Mr. Minerd has also held capital markets positions with Merrill Lynch and Continental Bank. Prior to that, he was a Certified Public Accountant and worked for the public accounting firm of Price Waterhouse. Mr. Minerd is a member of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York’s Investor Advisory Committee on Financial Markets, helping advise the NY Fed President and senior management at the bank about the current financial markets and ways the public and private sectors can better understand and mitigate systematic risks. Mr. Minerd also works with the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), advising on research and analysis of private sector infrastructure investment, and is a contributing member of the World Economic Forum (WEF). He is a regularly featured guest and contributor to leading financial media outlets, including The Wall Street Journal, The Financial Times, Bloomberg, and CNBC, where he shares insights on today’s financial climate. Mr. Minerd holds a B.S. degree in Economics from the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, and has completed graduate work at the University of Chicago Graduate School of Business and the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania.

Anne B. Walsh, CFA - Senior Managing Director, Assistant Chief Investment Officer, Fixed Income

Ms. Walsh joined Guggenheim in 2007 and is head of the Portfolio Construction Group (“PCG”) where she oversees more than $100 billion in fixed income investments including Agencies, Credit, Municipals, Residential Mortgage Backed Securities, Commercial Mortgage Backed Securities and Asset Backed Securities across several Guggenheim affiliates. The PCG is responsible for sector allocation, risk management and hedging strategies for client portfolios, and conveying Guggenheim’s macro-economic outlook to Portfolio Managers and fixed income Sector Specialists. Ms. Walsh specializes in liability driven portfolio management. With more than 29 years in the investment management industry, including roles as a money manager and as a selector of money managers, Ms. Walsh is well suited to understand the needs of institutional clients and how to address them. Prior to joining Guggenheim, Ms. Walsh served as Chief Investment Officer at Reinsurance Group of America, Incorporated, a recognized leader in the global life reinsurance industry. Prior to joining RG A in 2000, Ms. Walsh served as Vice President and Senior Investment Consultant for Zurich Scudder Investments. Earlier, she held roles at Lincoln Investment Management and American Bankers Insurance Group. Ms. Walsh received her BSBA and MBA from Auburn University and her J.D. from the University of Miami School of Law. She has earned the right to use the Chartered Financial Analyst® designation and is a member of the CFA Institute.

James Michal – Managing Director

Mr. Michal joined Guggenheim in 2008. He is dedicated to portfolio management for Guggenheim’s Total Return mandates. Mr. Michal is responsible for implementing macro and micro investment themes of the Chief Investment Officers, coordinating with sector heads and traders to determine credit trends and relative value, and for the day-to-day risk monitoring of the assets. Prior to joining Guggenheim, he was an Associate in Wachovia’s structured finance division. He focused on origination, marketing, structuring and execution of collateralized loan obligations for two years. Mr. Michal successfully contributed to a total of 11 completed transactions raising approximately $4.3 billion of capital. Prior to his time in structured credit products, he was an analyst in Wachovia’s corporate credit division focusing on portfolio management and loan syndications. Over two years, Mr. Michal underwrote a total of 12 syndicated transactions and managed the loan portfolio risk in the Integrated Electric Utility, Midstream Pipeline and Propane sectors. Mr. Michal earned a BSBA in Finance and International Business from Georgetown University.

RISKS

Investors should consider the following risk factors and special considerations associated with investing in the Fund. An investment in the Fund is subject to investment risk, including the possible loss of the entire principal amount invested.

Not a Complete Investment Program

An investment in the Common Shares of the Fund should not be considered a complete investment program. The Fund is intended for long-term investors seeking current income and capital appreciation. The Fund is not meant to provide a vehicle for those who wish to play short-term swings in the stock market. Each Common Shareholder should take into account the Fund’s investment objective as well as the Common Shareholder’s other investments when considering an investment in the Fund.

Investment and Market Risk

An investment in Common Shares of the Fund is subject to investment risk, including the possible loss of the entire principal amount that you invest. An investment in the Common Shares of the Fund represents an indirect investment in the securities owned by the Fund. The value of those securities may fluctuate, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably. The value of the securities owned by the Fund may decline due to general market conditions that are not specifically related to a particular issuer, such as real or perceived economic conditions, changes in interest or currency rates or changes in investor sentiment or market outlook generally. At any point in time, your Common Shares may be worth less than your original investment, including the reinvestment of Fund dividends and distributions.

Management Risk

The Fund is subject to management risk because it has an actively managed portfolio. The Investment Adviser and the Sub-Adviser will apply investment techniques and risk analyses in making investment decisions for the Fund, but there can be no guarantee that these will produce the desired results. The Fund’s allocation of its investments across various asset classes and sectors may vary significantly over time based on the Adviser’s analysis and judgment. As a result, the particular risks most relevant to an investment in the Fund, as well as the overall risk profile of the Fund’s portfolio, may vary over time.

Income Risk

The income investors receive from the Fund is based primarily on the interest it earns from its investments in Income Securities, which can vary widely over the short and long-term. If prevailing market interest rates drop, investors’ income from the Fund could drop as well. The Fund’s income could also be affected adversely when prevailing short-term interest rates increase and the Fund is utilizing leverage, although this risk is mitigated to the extent the Fund invests in floating-rate obligations.

Dividend Risk

Dividends on common stock and other Common Equity Securities which the Fund may hold are not fixed but are declared at the discretion of an issuer’s board of directors. There is no guarantee that the issuers of the equity securities in which the Fund invests will declare dividends in the future or that, if declared, they will remain at current levels or increase over time. The dividend income from the Fund’s investment in Common Equity Securities will be influenced by both general economic activity and issuer-specific factors. In the event of adverse changes in economic conditions or adverse events effecting a specific industry or issuer, the issuers of the Common Equity Securities held by the Fund may reduce the dividends paid on such securities.

Income Securities Risk

In addition to the risks discussed above, Income Securities, including high-yield bonds, are subject to certain risks, including:

Issuer Risk. The value of Income Securities may decline for a number of reasons which directly relate to the issuer, such as management performance, financial leverage, reduced demand for the issuer’s goods and services, historical and projected earnings, and the value of its assets.

Credit Risk. Credit risk is the risk that one or more debt obligations in the Fund’s portfolio will decline in price, or fail to pay interest or principal when due, because the issuer of the obligation experiences a decline in its financial status.

Interest Rate Risk. Interest rate risk is the risk that Income Securities will decline in value because of changes in market interest rates. When market interest rates rise, the market value of Income Securities generally will fall. During periods of rising interest rates, the average life of certain types of Income Securities may be extended because of slower than expected prepayments. This may lock in a below market yield, increase the security’s duration and reduce the value of the security. Investments in Income Securities with long-term maturities may experience significant price declines if long-term interest rates increase. These risks may be greater in the current market environment because interest rates are near historically low levels. The prices of longer-term securities fluctuate more than prices of shorter-term securities as interest rates change. The Fund’s use of leverage, as described below, will tend to increase common share interest rate risk. The Fund may utilize certain strategies, including taking positions in futures or interest rate swaps, for the purpose of reducing the interest rate sensitivity of credit securities held by the Fund and decreasing the Fund’s exposure to interest rate risk. The Fund is not required to hedge its exposure to interest rate risk and may choose not to do so. In addition, there is no assurance that any attempts by the Fund to reduce interest rate risk will be successful or that any hedges that the Fund may establish will perfectly correlate with movements in interest rates. The Fund may invest in variable and floating rate debt instruments, which generally are less sensitive to interest rate changes than fixed rate instruments, but generally will not increase in value if interest rates decline.

Reinvestment Risk. Reinvestment risk is the risk that income from the Fund’s portfolio will decline if the Fund invests the proceeds from matured, traded or called Income Securities at market interest rates that are below the Fund portfolio’s current earnings rate. A decline in income could affect the Common Shares’ market price or the overall return of the Fund.

Prepayment Risk. During periods of declining interest rates, borrowers may exercise their option to prepay principal earlier than scheduled, forcing the Fund to reinvest in lower yielding securities. This is known as call or prepayment risk. Income Securities frequently have call features that allow the issuer to repurchase the security prior to its stated maturity. An issuer may redeem an obligation if the issuer can refinance the debt at a lower cost due to declining interest rates or an improvement in the credit standing of the issuer.

Liquidity Risk. The Fund may invest without limitation in Income Securities for which there is no readily available trading market or which are otherwise illiquid, including certain high-yield bonds. The Fund may not be able to readily dispose of illiquid securities and obligations at prices that approximate those at which the Fund could sell such securities and obligations if they were more widely traded and, as a result of such illiquidity, the Fund may have to sell other investments or engage in borrowing transactions if necessary to raise cash to meet its obligations. In addition, limited liquidity could affect the market price of Income Securities, thereby adversely affecting the Fund’s net asset value and ability to make distributions.

Valuation of Certain Income Securities. The Sub-Adviser may use the fair value method to value investments if market quotations for them are not readily available or are deemed unreliable, or if events occurring after the close of a securities market and before the Fund values its assets would materially affect net asset value. Because the secondary markets for certain investments may be limited, they may be difficult to value. Where market quotations are not readily available, valuation may require more research than for more liquid investments. In addition, elements of judgment may play a greater role in valuation in such cases than for investments with a more active secondary market because there is less reliable objective data available. A security that is fair valued may be valued at a price higher or lower than the value determined by other funds using their own fair valuation procedures. Prices obtained by the Fund upon the sale of such securities may not equal the value at which the Fund carried the investment on its books, which would adversely affect the net asset value of the Fund.

Duration and Maturity Risk. The Fund has no set policy regarding portfolio maturity or duration. Holding long duration and long maturity investments will expose the Fund to certain magnified risks. These risks include interest rate risk, credit risk and liquidity risks as discussed above. Generally speaking, the longer the duration of the Fund’s portfolio, the more exposure the Fund will have to interest rate risk described above.

Below-Investment Grade Securities Risk

The Fund may invest in Income Securities rated below-investment grade or, if unrated, determined by the Sub-Adviser to be of comparable credit quality, which are commonly referred to as “high-yield” or “junk” bonds. Investment in securities of below-investment grade quality involves substantial risk of loss. Income Securities of below-investment grade quality are predominantly speculative with respect to the issuer’s capacity to pay interest and repay principal when due and therefore involve a greater risk of default or decline in market value due to adverse economic and issuer-specific developments. Income Securities of below-investment grade quality display increased price sensitivity to changing interest rates and to a deteriorating economic environment. The market values for Income Securities of below-investment grade quality tend to be more volatile and such securities tend to be less liquid than investment grade debt securities. To the extent that a secondary market does exist for certain below investment grade securities, the market for them may be subject to irregular trading activity, wide bid/ask spreads and extended trade settlement periods. Because of the substantial risks associated with investments in below investment grade securities, you could have an increased risk of losing money on your investment in Common Shares, both in the short-term and the long-term. To the extent that the Fund invests in securities that have not been rated by a rating agency, the Fund’s ability to achieve its investment objectives will be more dependent on the Adviser’s credit analysis than would be the case when the Fund invests in rated securities.

Structured Finance Investments Risk

The Fund’s structured finance investments may include residential and commercial mortgage-related and other asset-backed securities issued by governmental entities and private issuers. Holders of structured finance investments bear risks of the underlying investments, index or reference obligation and are subject to counterparty risk. The Fund may have the right to receive payments only from the structured product, and generally does not have direct rights against the issuer or the entity that sold the assets to be securitized. While certain structured finance investments enable the investor to acquire interests in a pool of securities without the brokerage and other expenses associated with directly holding the same securities, investors in structured finance investments generally pay their share of the structured product’s administrative and other expenses. Although it is difficult to predict whether the prices of indices and securities underlying structured finance investments will rise or fall, these prices (and, therefore, the prices of structured finance investments) will be influenced by the same types of political and economic events that affect issuers of securities and capital markets generally. If the issuer of a structured product uses shorter term financing to purchase longer term securities, the issuer may be forced to sell its securities at below market prices if it experiences difficulty in obtaining short-term financing, which may adversely affect the value of the structured finance investment owned by the Fund.

The Fund may invest in structured finance products collateralized by low grade or defaulted loans or securities. Investments in such structured finance products are subject to the risks associated with below investment grade securities. Such securities are characterized by high risk. It is likely that an economic recession could severely disrupt the market for such securities and may have an adverse impact on the value of such securities.

The Fund may invest in senior and subordinated classes issued by structured finance vehicles. The payment of cash flows from the underlying assets to senior classes take precedence over those of subordinated classes, and therefore subordinated classes are subject to greater risk. Furthermore, the leveraged nature of subordinated classes may magnify the adverse impact on such class of changes in the value of the assets, changes in the distributions on the assets, defaults and recoveries on the assets, capital gains and losses on the assets, prepayment on assets and availability, price and interest rates of assets.

Structured finance securities are typically privately offered and sold, and thus are not registered under the securities laws. As a result, investments in structured finance securities may be characterized by the Fund as illiquid securities; however, an active dealer market may exist which would allow such securities to be considered liquid in some circumstances.

Mortgage-Backed Securities Risk. Mortgage-backed securities represent an interest in a pool of mortgages. The risks associated with mortgage-backed securities include: (1) credit risk associated with the performance of the underlying mortgage properties and of the borrowers owning these properties; (2) adverse changes in economic conditions and circumstances, which are more likely to have an adverse impact on mortgage-backed securities secured by loans on certain types of commercial properties than on those secured by loans on residential properties; (3) prepayment risk, which can lead to significant fluctuations in the value of the mortgage-backed security; (4) loss of all or part of the premium, if any, paid; and (5) decline in the market value of the security, whether resulting from changes in interest rates, prepayments on the underlying mortgage collateral or perceptions of the credit risk associated with the underlying mortgage collateral.

When market interest rates decline, more mortgages are refinanced and the securities are paid off earlier than expected. Prepayments may also occur on a scheduled basis or due to foreclosure. When market interest rates increase, the market values of mortgage-backed securities decline. At the same time, however, mortgage refinancings and prepayments slow, which lengthens the effective maturities of these securities. As a result, the negative effect of the rate increase on the market value of mortgage-backed securities is usually more pronounced than it is for other types of debt securities. In addition, due to increased instability in the credit markets, the market for some mortgage-backed securities has experienced reduced liquidity and greater volatility with respect to the value of such securities, making it more difficult to value such securities. The Fund may invest in sub-prime mortgages or mortgage-backed securities that are backed by sub-prime mortgages.

Moreover, the relationship between prepayments and interest rates may give some high-yielding mortgage-related and asset-backed securities less potential for growth in value than conventional bonds with comparable maturities. In addition, in periods of falling interest rates, the rate of prepayments tends to increase. During such periods, the reinvestment of prepayment proceeds by the Fund will generally be at lower rates than the rates that were carried by the obligations that have been prepaid. Because of these and other reasons, mortgage-related and asset-backed security’s total return and maturity may be difficult to predict precisely. To the extent that the Fund purchases mortgage-related and asset-backed securities at a premium, prepayments (which may be made without penalty) may result in loss of the Fund’s principal investment to the extent of premium paid.

Mortgage-backed securities generally are classified as either commercial mortgage-backed securities (“CMBS”) or residential mortgage-backed securities (“RMBS”), each of which are subject to certain specific risks.

Commercial Mortgage-Backed Securities Risk. The market for CMBS developed more recently and, in terms of total outstanding principal amount of issues, is relatively small compared to the market for residential single-family mortgage-related securities. CMBS are subject to particular risks, including lack of standardized terms, have shorter maturities than residential mortgage loans and provide for payment of all or substantially all of the principal only at maturity rather than regular amortization of principal. In addition, commercial lending generally is viewed as exposing the lender to a greater risk of loss than one-to-four family residential lending. Commercial lending typically involves larger loans to single borrowers or groups of related borrowers than residential one-to-four family mortgage loans. In addition, the repayment of loans secured by income producing properties typically is dependent upon the successful operation of the related real estate project and the cash flow generated therefrom. Net operating income of an income-producing property can be affected by, among other things: tenant mix, success of tenant businesses, property management decisions, property location and condition, competition from comparable types of properties, changes in laws that increase operating expense or limit rents that may be charged, any need to address environmental contamination at the property, the occurrence of any uninsured casualty at the property, changes in national, regional or local economic conditions and/or specific industry segments, declines in regional or local real estate values, declines in regional or local rental or occupancy rates, increases in interest rates, real estate tax rates and other operating expenses, change in governmental rules, regulations and fiscal policies, including environmental legislation, acts of God, terrorism, social unrest and civil disturbances. Consequently, adverse changes in economic conditions and circumstances are more likely to have an adverse impact on mortgage-related securities secured by loans on commercial properties than on those secured by loans on residential properties. Additional risks may be presented by the type and use of a particular commercial property. Special risks are presented by hospitals, nursing homes, hospitality properties and certain other property types. Commercial property values and net operating income are subject to volatility, which may result in net operating income becoming insufficient to cover debt service on the related mortgage loan. The exercise of remedies and successful realization of liquidation proceeds relating to CMBS may be highly dependent on the performance of the servicer or special servicer. There may be a limited number of special servicers available, particularly those that do not have conflicts of interest.

Residential Mortgage-Backed Securities Risk. Credit-related risk on RMBS arises from losses due to delinquencies and defaults by the borrowers in payments on the underlying mortgage loans and breaches by originators and servicers of their obligations under the underlying documentation pursuant to which the RMBS are issued. The rate of delinquencies and defaults on residential mortgage loans and the aggregate amount of the resulting losses will be affected by a number of factors, including general economic conditions, particularly those in the area where the related mortgaged property is located, the level of the borrower’s equity in the mortgaged property and the individual financial circumstances of the borrower. If a residential mortgage loan is in default, foreclosure on the related residential property may be a lengthy and difficult process involving significant legal and other expenses. The net proceeds obtained by the holder on a residential mortgage loan following the foreclosure on the related property may be less than the total amount that remains due on the loan. The prospect of incurring a loss upon the foreclosure of the related property may lead the holder of the residential mortgage loan to restructure the residential mortgage loan or otherwise delay the foreclosure process.

Sub-Prime Mortgage Market Risk. The residential mortgage market in the United States has experienced difficulties that may adversely affect the performance and market value of certain mortgages and mortgage-related securities. Delinquencies and losses on residential mortgage loans (especially sub-prime and second-line mortgage loans) generally have increased recently and may continue to increase, and a decline in or flattening of housing values (as has recently been experienced and may continue to be experienced in many housing markets) may exacerbate such delinquencies and losses. Borrowers with adjustable rate mortgage loans are more sensitive to changes in interest rates, which affect their monthly mortgage payments, and may be unable to secure replacement mortgages at comparably low interest rates. Also, a number of residential mortgage loan originators have experienced serious financial difficulties or bankruptcy. Largely due to the foregoing, reduced investor demand for mortgage loans and mortgage-related securities and increased investor yield requirements have caused limited liquidity in the secondary market for mortgage-related securities, which can adversely affect the market value of mortgage-related securities. It is possible that such limited liquidity in such secondary markets could continue or worsen. If the economy of the United States deteriorates further, the incidence of mortgage foreclosures, especially sub-prime mortgages, may increase, which may adversely affect the value of any mortgage-backed securities owned by the Fund.

The significance of the mortgage crisis and loan defaults in residential mortgage loan sectors led to the enactment of numerous pieces of legislation relating to the mortgage and housing markets. These actions, along with future legislation or regulation, may have significant impacts on the mortgage market generally and may result in a reduction of available transactional opportunities for the Fund or an increase in the cost associated with such transactions and may adversely impact the value of RMBS.

During the mortgage crisis, a number of originators and servicers of residential and commercial mortgage loans, including some of the largest originators and servicers in the residential and commercial mortgage loan market, experienced serious financial difficulties. Such difficulties may affect the performance of non-agency RMBS and CMBS. There can be no assurance that originators and servicers of mortgage loans will not continue to experience serious financial difficulties or experience such difficulties in the future, including becoming subject to bankruptcy or insolvency proceedings, or that underwriting procedures and policies and protections against fraud will be sufficient in the future to prevent such financial difficulties or significant levels of default or delinquency on mortgage loans.

Asset-Backed Securities Risk. ABS involve certain risks in addition to those presented by mortgage-backed securities. Therefore, there is the possibility that recoveries on the underlying collateral may not, in some cases, be available to support payments on these securities. ABS do not have the benefit of the same security interest in the underlying collateral as mortgage-backed securities and are more dependent on the borrower’s ability to pay and may provide the Fund with a less effective security interest in the related collateral than do mortgage-related securities. The collateral underlying ABS may constitute assets related to a wide range of industries and sectors. For example, ABS can be collateralized with credit card and automobile receivables. Credit card receivables are generally unsecured, and the debtors are entitled to the protection of a number of state and federal consumer credit laws, many of which give debtors the right to set off certain amounts owed on the credit cards, thereby reducing the balance due. Most issuers of automobile receivables permit the servicers to retain possession of the underlying obligations. If the servicer were to sell these obligations to another party, there is a risk that the purchaser would acquire an interest superior to that of the holders of the related automobile receivables. In addition, because of the large number of vehicles involved in a typical issuance and technical requirements under state laws, the trustee for the holders of the automobile receivables may not have an effective security interest in all of the obligations backing such receivables. If the economy of the United States deteriorates, defaults on securities backed by credit card, automobile and other receivables may increase, which may adversely affect the value of any ABS owned by the Fund. In addition, these securities may provide the Fund with a less effective security interest in the related collateral than do mortgage-related securities. Therefore, there is the possibility that recoveries on the underlying collateral may not, in some cases, be available to support payments on these securities.

Most issuers of automobile receivables permit the servicers to retain possession of the underlying obligations. If the servicer were to sell these obligations to another party, there is a risk that the purchaser would acquire an interest superior to that of the holders of the related automobile receivables. In addition, because of the large number of vehicles involved in a typical issuance and technical requirements under state laws, the trustee for the holders of the automobile receivables may not have an effective security interest in all of the obligations backing such receivables. In recent years, certain automobile manufacturers have been granted access to emergency loans from the U.S. Government and have experienced bankruptcy. As a result of these events, the value of securities backed by receivables from the sale or lease of automobiles may be adversely affected.

If the economy of the United States deteriorates, defaults on securities backed by credit card, automobile and other receivables may increase, which may adversely affect the value of any ABS owned by the Fund. In addition, these securities may provide the Fund with a less effective security interest in the related collateral than do mortgage-related securities. Therefore, there is the possibility that recoveries on the underlying collateral may not, in some cases, be available to support payments on these securities.

 ABS collateralized by other types of assets are subject to risks associated with the underlying collateral.

Risks Associated with CDOs. The credit quality of CDO securities depends primarily upon the quality of the underlying assets and the level of credit support and/or enhancement provided. The underlying assets (e.g., debt obligations) of a CDO are subject to prepayments, which shorten the weighted average maturity and may lower the return of the securities issued by the CDO. If the credit support or enhancement is exhausted, losses or delays in payment may result if the required payments of principal and interest are not made. The value of CDO securities also may change because of changes in market value, that is changes in the market’s perception of the creditworthiness of the servicing agent for the pool, the originator of the pool, or the financial institution or fund providing the credit support or enhancement.

Risks Associated with Risk-Linked Securities. RLS are a form of derivative issued by insurance companies and insurance-related special purpose vehicles that apply securitization techniques to catastrophic property and casualty damages. Unlike other insurable low-severity, high-probability events (such as auto collision coverage), the insurance risk of which can be diversified by writing large numbers of similar policies, the holders of a typical RLS are exposed to the risks from high-severity, low-probability events such as that posed by major earthquakes or hurricanes. RLS represent a method of reinsurance, by which insurance companies transfer their own portfolio risk to other reinsurance companies and, in the case of RLS, to the capital markets. A typical RLS provides for income and return of capital similar to other fixed-income investments, but involves full or partial default if losses resulting from a certain catastrophe exceeded a predetermined amount. In essence, investors invest funds in RLS and if a catastrophe occurs that “triggers” the RLS, investors may lose some or all of the capital invested. In the case of an event, the funds are paid to the bond sponsor — an insurer, reinsurer or corporation — to cover losses. In return, the bond sponsors pay interest to investors for this catastrophe protection. RLS can be structured to pay-off on three types of variables—insurance-industry catastrophe loss indices, insure-specific catastrophe losses and parametric indices based on the physical characteristics of catastrophic events. Such variables are difficult to predict or model, and the risk and potential return profiles of RLS may be difficult to assess. Catastrophe-related RLS have been in use since the 1990s, and the securitization and risk-transfer aspects of such RLS are beginning to be employed in other insurance and risk-related areas. No active trading market may exist for certain RLS, which may impair the ability of the Fund to realize full value in the event of the need to liquidate such assets.

Risks Associated with Structured Notes. Investments in structured notes involve risks associated with the issuer of the note and the reference instrument. Where the Fund’s investments in structured notes are based upon the movement of one or more factors, including currency exchange rates, interest rates, referenced bonds and stock indices, depending on the factor used and the use of multipliers or deflators, changes in interest rates and movement of the factor may cause significant price fluctuations. Additionally, changes in the reference instrument or security may cause the interest rate on the structured note to be reduced to zero, and any further changes in the reference instrument may then reduce the principal amount payable on maturity. Structured notes may be less liquid than other types of securities and more volatile than the reference instrument or security underlying the note.

Senior Loans Risk

The risks associated with Senior Loans of below-investment grade quality are similar to the risks of other lower grade Income Securities, although Senior Loans are typically senior and secured in contrast to subordinated and unsecured Income Securities. Senior Loans’ higher standing has historically resulted in generally higher recoveries in the event of a corporate reorganization. In addition, because their interest payments are adjusted for changes in short-term interest rates, investments in Senior Loans generally have less interest rate risk than other lower grade Income Securities, which may have fixed interest rates. The Fund’s investments in Senior Loans are typically below-investment grade and are considered speculative because of the credit risk of their issuers. Such companies are more likely to default on their payments of interest and principal owed to the Fund, and such defaults could reduce the Fund’s net asset value and income distributions. An economic downturn generally leads to a higher non-payment rate, and a debt obligation may lose significant value before a default occurs. Moreover, any specific collateral used to secure a Senior Loan may decline in value or become illiquid, which would adversely affect the Senior Loan’s value.

Economic and other events (whether real or perceived) can reduce the demand for certain Senior Loans or Senior Loans generally, which may reduce market prices and cause the Fund’s net asset value per share to fall. The frequency and magnitude of such changes cannot be predicted.

Loans and other debt instruments are also subject to the risk of price declines due to increases in prevailing interest rates, although floating-rate debt instruments are substantially less exposed to this risk than fixed-rate debt instruments. Interest rate changes may also increase prepayments of debt obligations and require the Fund to invest assets at lower yields. No active trading market may exist for certain Senior Loans, which may impair the ability of the Fund to realize full value in the event of the need to liquidate such assets. Adverse market conditions may impair the liquidity of some actively traded Senior Loans.

Subordinated Secured Loans Risk

Subordinated secured Loans generally are subject to similar risks as those associated with investment in Senior Loans, Second Lien Loans and below investment grade securities. However, such loans may rank lower in right of payment than any outstanding Senior Loans, Second Lien Loans or other debt instruments with higher priority of the Borrower and therefore are subject to additional risk that the cash flow of the Borrower and any property securing the loan may be insufficient to meet scheduled payments and repayment of principal in the event of default or bankruptcy after giving effect to the higher ranking secured obligations of the Borrower. Subordinated secured Loans are expected to have greater price volatility than Senior Loans and Second Lien Loans and may be less liquid.

Unsecured Loans Risk

Unsecured Loans generally are subject to similar risks as those associated with investment in Senior Loans, Second Lien Loans, subordinated secured Loans and below investment grade securities. However, because unsecured Loans have lower priority in right of payment to any higher ranking obligations of the Borrower and are not backed by a security interest in any specific collateral, they are subject to additional risk that the cash flow of the Borrower and available assets may be insufficient to meet scheduled payments and repayment of principal after giving effect to any higher ranking obligations of the Borrower. Unsecured Loans are expected to have greater price volatility than Senior Loans, Second Lien Loans and subordinated secured Loans and may be less liquid.

Second Lien Loans Risk

Second Lien Loans are subject to the same risks associated with investment in Senior Loans and other lower grade Income Securities. However, Second Lien Loans are second in right of payment to Senior Loans and therefore are subject to the additional risk that the cash flow of the borrower and any property securing the Loan may be insufficient to meet scheduled payments after giving effect to the senior secured obligations of the borrower. Second Lien Loans are expected to have greater price volatility and exposure to losses upon default than Senior Loans and may be less liquid. There is also a possibility that originators will not be able to sell participations in Second Lien Loans, which would create greater credit risk exposure.

Mezzanine Investments Risk

Mezzanine Investments are subject to the same risks associated with investment in Senior Loans, Second Lien Loans and other lower grade Income Securities. However, Mezzanine Investments may rank lower in right of payment than any outstanding Senior Loans and Second Lien Loans of the borrower, or may be unsecured (i.e., not backed by a security interest in any specific collateral), and are subject to the additional risk that the cash flow of the borrower and available assets may be insufficient to meet scheduled payments after giving effect to any higher ranking obligations of the borrower. Mezzanine Investments are expected to have greater price volatility and exposure to losses upon default than Senior Loans and Second Lien Loans and may be less liquid.

Convertible Securities Risk

Convertible securities generally offer lower interest or dividend yields than non-convertible securities of similar quality. As with all Income Securities, the market values of convertible securities tend to decline as interest rates increase and, conversely, to increase as interest rates decline. However, when the market price of the common stock underlying a convertible security exceeds the conversion price, the convertible security tends to reflect the market price of the underlying common stock. As the market price of the underlying common stock declines, the convertible security tends to trade increasingly on a yield basis and thus may not decline in price to the same extent as the underlying common stock. Convertible securities rank senior to common stock in an issuer’s capital structure and consequently entail less risk than the issuer’s common stock.

Preferred Stock Risks

Preferred stock represents the senior residual interest in the assets of an issuer after meeting all claims, with priority to corporate income and liquidation payments over the issuer’s common stock. As such, preferred stock is inherently more risky than the bonds and other debt instruments of the issuer, but less risky than its common stock. Certain preferred stocks contain provisions that allow an issuer under certain conditions to skip (in the case of “non-cumulative” preferred stocks) or defer (in the case of “cumulative” preferred stocks) dividend payments. Preferred stocks often contain provisions that allow for redemption in the event of certain tax or legal changes or at the issuer’s call. Preferred stocks typically do not provide any voting rights, except in cases when dividends are in arrears beyond a certain time period. There is no assurance that dividends on preferred stocks in which the Fund invests will be declared or otherwise made payable. If the Fund owns preferred stock that is deferring its distributions, the Fund may be required to report income for U.S. federal income tax purposes while it is not receiving cash payments corresponding to such income. When interest rates fall below the rate payable on an issue of preferred stock or for other reasons, the issuer may redeem the preferred stock, generally after an initial period of call protection in which the stock is not redeemable. Preferred stocks may be significantly less liquid than many other securities, such as U.S. Government securities, corporate debt and common stock.

Foreign Securities Risk

The Fund may invest in non-U.S. dollar-denominated Income Securities of foreign issuers. Investing in foreign issuers may involve certain risks not typically associated with investing in securities of U.S. issuers due to increased exposure to foreign economic, political and legal developments, including favorable or unfavorable changes in currency exchange rates, exchange control regulations (including currency blockage), expropriation or nationalization of assets, imposition of withholding taxes on payments, and possible difficulty in obtaining and enforcing judgments against foreign entities. Furthermore, issuers of foreign securities and obligations are subject to different, often less comprehensive, accounting, reporting and disclosure requirements than domestic issuers. The securities and obligations of some foreign companies and foreign markets are less liquid and at times more volatile than comparable U.S. securities, obligations and markets. Foreign brokerage commissions and other fees are also generally higher than in the United States. The laws of some foreign countries may limit the Fund’s ability to invest in securities and obligations of certain issuers located in these foreign countries. There are also special tax considerations which apply to securities and obligations of foreign issuers and securities and obligations principally traded overseas. These risks may be more pronounced to the extent that the Fund invests a significant amount of its assets in companies located in one region and to the extent that the Fund invests in securities of issuers in emerging markets. The Fund may also invest in U.S. dollar-denominated Income Securities of foreign issuers, which are subject to many of the risks described above regarding Income Securities of foreign issuers denominated in foreign currencies.

Emerging Markets Risk

The Fund may invest up to 10% of its total assets in Income Securities the issuers of which are located in countries considered to be emerging markets, and investments in such securities are considered speculative. Heightened risks of investing in emerging markets government debt include: smaller market capitalization of securities markets, which may suffer periods of relative illiquidity; significant price volatility; restrictions on foreign investment; and potential restrictions on repatriation of investment income and capital. Furthermore, foreign investors may be required to register the proceeds of sales and future economic or political crises could lead to price controls, forced mergers, expropriation or confiscatory taxation, seizure, nationalization or creation of government monopolies. The currencies of emerging market countries may experience significant declines against the U.S. dollar, and devaluation may occur subsequent to investments in these currencies by the Fund. Inflation and rapid fluctuations in inflation rates have had, and may continue to have, negative effects on the economies and securities markets of certain emerging market countries.

Foreign Currency Risk

The value of securities denominated or quoted in foreign currencies may be adversely affected by fluctuations in the relative currency exchange rates and by exchange control regulations. The Fund’s investment performance may be negatively affected by a devaluation of a currency in which the Fund’s investments are denominated or quoted. Further, the Fund’s investment performance may be significantly affected, either positively or negatively, by currency exchange rates because the U.S. dollar value of securities denominated or quoted in another currency will increase or decrease in response to changes in the value of such currency in relation to the U.S. dollar. Finally, the Fund’s distributions are paid in U.S. dollars, and to the extent the Fund’s assets are denominated in currencies other than the U.S. dollar, there is a risk that the value of any distribution from such assets may decrease if the currency in which such assets or distributions are denominated falls in relation to the value of the U.S. dollar. The Fund expects initially to seek to hedge its exposures to foreign currencies but may, at the discretion of the Investment Adviser, at any time limit or eliminate foreign currency hedging activity. To the extent the Fund does not hedge (or is unsuccessful in seeking to hedge) its foreign currency risk, the value of the Fund’s assets and income could be adversely affected by currency exchange rate movements.

Redenomination Risk

Continuing uncertainty as to the status of the euro and the European Monetary Union (the “EMU”) has created significant volatility in currency and financial markets generally. Any partial or complete dissolution of the EMU could have significant adverse effects on currency and financial markets, and on the values of the Fund’s portfolio investments. If one or more EMU countries were to stop using the euro as its primary currency, the Fund’s investments in such countries may be redenominated into a different or newly adopted currency. As a result, the value of those investments could decline significantly and unpredictably. In addition, securities or other investments that are redenominated may be subject to foreign currency risk, liquidity risk and valuation risk to a greater extent than similar investments currently denominated in euros. To the extent a currency used for redenomination purposes is not specified in respect of certain EMU-related investments, or should the euro cease to be used entirely, the currency in which such investments are denominated may be unclear, making such investments particularly difficult to value or dispose of. The Fund may incur additional expenses to the extent it is required to seek judicial or other clarification of the denomination or value of such securities.

Common Equity Securities Risk

The Fund may invest up to 50% of its total assets in Common Equity Securities. An adverse event, such as an unfavorable earnings report, may depress the value of a particular common stock held by the Fund. Also, the prices of equity securities are sensitive to general movements in the stock market, so a drop in the stock market may depress the prices of equity securities to which the Fund has exposure. Common Equity Securities’ prices fluctuate for a number of reasons, including changes in investors’ perceptions of the financial condition of an issuer, the general condition of the relevant stock market, and broader domestic and international political and economic events. In addition, Common Equity Securities’ prices may be particularly sensitive to rising interest rates, as the cost of capital rises and borrowing costs increase. At times, stock markets can be volatile and stock prices can change substantially. While broad market measures of Common Equity Securities have historically generated higher average returns than Income Securities, Common Equity Securities have also experienced significantly more volatility in those returns. Common Equity Securities in which the Fund may invest are structurally subordinated to preferred stock, bonds and other debt instruments in a company’s capital structure in terms of priority to corporate income and are therefore inherently more risky than preferred stock or debt instruments of such issuers.

Risks Associated with the Fund’s Covered Call Option Strategy

The ability of the Fund to achieve its investment objective is partially dependent on the successful implementation of its option strategy. Risks that may adversely affect the ability of the Fund to successfully implement its option strategy include the following:

Risks Associated with Options on Securities. There are several risks associated with transactions in options on securities used in connection with the Fund’s option strategy. For example, there are significant differences between the securities and options markets that could result in an imperfect correlation between these markets, causing a given transaction not to achieve its objectives. A decision as to whether, when and how to use options involves the exercise of skill and judgment, and even a well conceived transaction may be unsuccessful to some degree because of market behavior or unexpected events.

Risks Associated with Covered Call and Put Options. As the writer of a covered call option, the Fund forgoes, during the option’s life, the opportunity to profit from increases in the market value of the security covering the call option above the sum of the premium and the strike price of the call, but has retained the risk of loss should the price of the underlying security decline. As the Fund writes covered calls over more of its portfolio, its ability to benefit from capital appreciation becomes more limited. The writer of an option has no control over the time when it may be required to fulfill its obligation as a writer of the option. Once an option writer has received an exercise notice, it cannot effect a closing purchase transaction in order to terminate its obligation under the option and must deliver the underlying security at the exercise price.

When the Fund writes covered put options, it bears the risk of loss if the value of the underlying stock declines below the exercise price minus the put premium. If the option is exercised, the Fund could incur a loss if it is required to purchase the stock underlying the put option at a price greater than the market price of the stock at the time of exercise plus the put premium the Fund received when it wrote the option. While the Fund’s potential gain in writing a covered put option is limited to distributions earned on the liquid assets securing the put option plus the premium received from the purchaser of the put option, the Fund risks a loss equal to the entire exercise price of the option minus the put premium.

Exchange-Listed Option Risk. There can be no assurance that a liquid market will exist when the Fund seeks to close out an option position on an options exchange. Reasons for the absence of a liquid secondary market on an exchange include the following: (i) there may be insufficient trading interest in certain options; (ii) restrictions may be imposed by an exchange on opening transactions or closing transactions or both; (iii) trading halts, suspensions or other restrictions may be imposed with respect to particular classes or series of options; (iv) unusual or unforeseen circumstances may interrupt normal operations on an exchange; (v) the facilities of an exchange or the Options Clearing Corporation (“OCC”) may not at all times be adequate to handle current trading volume; or (vi) one or more exchanges could, for economic or other reasons, decide or be compelled at some future date to discontinue the trading of options (or a particular class or series of options). If trading were discontinued, the secondary market on that exchange (or in that class or series of options) would cease to exist. However, outstanding options on that exchange that had been issued by the OCC as a result of trades on that exchange would continue to be exercisable in accordance with their terms. If the Fund were unable to close out a covered call option that it had written on a security, it would not be able to sell the underlying security unless the option expired without exercise.

The hours of trading for options on an exchange may not conform to the hours during which the underlying securities are traded. To the extent that the options markets close before the markets for the underlying securities, significant price and rate movements can take place in the underlying markets that cannot be reflected in the options markets. Call options are marked to market daily and their value will be affected by changes in the value and dividend rates of the underlying common stocks, an increase in interest rates, changes in the actual or perceived volatility of the stock market and the underlying common stocks and the remaining time to the options’ expiration. Additionally, the exercise price of an option may be adjusted downward before the option’s expiration as a result of the occurrence of certain corporate events affecting the underlying equity security, such as extraordinary dividends, stock splits, merger or other extraordinary distributions or events. A reduction in the exercise price of an option would reduce the Fund’s capital appreciation potential on the underlying security.

OTC Option Risk. The Fund may write (sell) OTC options. Options written by the Fund with respect to non-U.S. securities, indices or sectors generally will be OTC options. OTC options differ from exchange-listed options in that they are two-party contracts, with exercise price, premium and other terms negotiated between buyer and seller, and generally do not have as much market liquidity as exchange-listed options. The counterparties to these transactions typically will be major international banks, broker-dealers and financial institutions. The Fund may be required to treat as illiquid securities being used to cover certain written OTC options. The OTC options written by the Fund will not be issued, guaranteed or cleared by the Options Clearing Corporation. In addition, the Fund’s ability to terminate the OTC options may be more limited than with exchange-traded options. Banks, broker-dealers or other financial institutions participating in such transaction may fail to settle a transaction in accordance with the terms of the option as written. In the event of default or insolvency of the counterparty, the Fund may be unable to liquidate an OTC option position.

Risks of Real Property Asset Companies

 The Fund may invest in Income Securities and Common Equity Securities issued by Real Property Asset Companies.

Real Estate Risks. Because of the Fund’s ability to make indirect investments in real estate and in the securities of companies in the real estate industry, it is subject to risks associated with the direct ownership of real estate. These risks include:

  • declines in the value of real estate;
  • general and local economic conditions;
  • unavailability of mortgage funds;
  • overbuilding;
  • extended vacancies of properties;
  • increased competition;
  • increases in property taxes and operating expenses;
  • changes in zoning laws;
  • losses due to costs of cleaning up environmental problems and contamination;
  • limitations on, or unavailability of, insurance on economic terms;
  • liability to third parties for damages resulting from environmental problems;
  • casualty or condemnation losses;
  • limitations on rents;
  • changes in neighborhood values and the appeal of properties to tenants;
  • changes in valuation due to the impact of terrorist incidents on a particular property or area, or on a segment of the economy; and
  • changes in interest rates.

 

National Resources and Commodities Risks. Because of the Fund’s ability to make indirect investments in natural resources and physical commodities, and in Real Property Asset Companies engaged in oil and gas exploration and production, gold and other precious metals, steel and iron ore production, energy services, forest products, chemicals, coal, alternative energy sources and environmental services, as well as related transportation companies and equipment manufacturers, the Fund is subject to risks associated with special risks, which include:

Supply and Demand Risk. A decrease in the production of a physical commodity or a decrease in the volume of such commodity available for transportation, mining, processing, storage or distribution may adversely impact the financial performance of an energy, natural resources, basic materials or an associated company that devotes a portion of its business to that commodity. Production declines and volume decreases could be caused by various factors, including catastrophic events affecting production, depletion of resources, labor difficulties, environmental proceedings, increased regulations, equipment failures and unexpected maintenance problems, import supply disruption, governmental expropriation, political upheaval or conflicts or increased competition from alternative energy sources or commodity prices. Alternatively, a sustained decline in demand for such commodities could also adversely affect the financial performance of energy, natural resources, basic materials or associated companies. Factors that could lead to a decline in demand include economic recession or other adverse economic conditions, higher taxes on commodities or increased governmental regulations, increases in fuel economy, consumer shifts to the use of alternative commodities or fuel sources, changes in commodity prices, or weather.

Depletion and Exploration Risk. Many energy, natural resources, basic materials and associated companies are engaged in the production of one or more physical commodities or are engaged in transporting, storing, distributing and processing these items on behalf of shippers. To maintain or grow their revenues, these companies or their customers need to maintain or expand their reserves through exploration of new sources of supply, through the development of existing sources, through acquisitions or through long-term contracts to acquire reserves. The financial performance of energy, natural resources, basic materials and associated companies may be adversely affected if they, or the companies to whom they provide the service, are unable to cost-effectively acquire additional reserves sufficient to replace the natural decline.

Operational and Geological Risk. Energy, natural resources, basic materials companies and associated companies are subject to specific operational and geological risks in addition to normal business and management risks. Some examples of operational risks include mine rock falls, underground explosions and pit wall failures. Geological risk would include faulting of the ore body and misinterpretation of geotechnical data.

Regulatory Risk. Energy, natural resources, basic materials and associated companies are subject to significant federal, state and local government regulation in virtually every aspect of their operations, including how facilities are constructed, maintained and operated, environmental and safety controls, and the prices they may charge for the products and services they provide. Various governmental authorities have the power to enforce compliance with these regulations and the permits issued under them, and violators are subject to administrative, civil and criminal penalties, including civil fines, injunctions or both. Stricter laws, regulations or enforcement policies could be enacted in the future which would likely increase compliance costs and may adversely affect the operations and financial performance of energy, natural resources and basic materials companies.

Commodity Pricing Risk. The operations and financial performance of energy, natural resources and basic materials companies may be directly affected by commodity prices, especially those energy, natural resources, basic materials and associated companies that own the underlying commodity. Commodity prices fluctuate for several reasons, including changes in market and economic conditions, the impact of weather on demand, levels of domestic production and imported commodities, energy conservation, domestic and foreign governmental regulation and taxation, the availability of local, intrastate and interstate transportation systems, governmental expropriation and political upheaval and conflicts. Volatility of commodity prices, which may lead to a reduction in production or supply, may also negatively impact the performance of energy, natural resources, basic materials and associated companies that are solely involved in the transportation, processing, storing, distribution or marketing of commodities. Volatility of commodity prices may also make it more difficult for energy, natural resources, basic materials and associated companies to raise capital to the extent the market perceives that their performance may be directly or indirectly tied to commodity prices.

Precious Metals Pricing Risk. The Fund may invest in companies that have a material exposure to precious metals, such as gold, silver and platinum and precious metals related instruments and securities. The price of precious metals can fluctuate widely and is affected by numerous factors beyond the Fund’s control including: global or regional political, economic or financial events and situations; investors’ expectations with respect to the future rates of inflation and movements in world equity, financial and property markets; global supply and demand for specific precious metals, which is influenced by such factors as mine production and net forward selling activities by precious metals producers, central bank purchases and sales, jewelry demand and the supply of recycled jewelry, net investment demand and industrial demand, net of recycling; interest rates and currency exchange rates, particularly the strength of and confidence in the U.S. dollar; and investment and trading activities of hedge funds, commodity funds and other speculators. The Fund does not intend to hold physical precious metals.

Risks of Personal Property Asset Companies

The Fund may invest in Income Securities and Common Equity Securities issued by Personal Property Asset Companies. Personal (as opposed to real) property includes any tangible, movable property or asset. The Fund will typically seek to invest in Income Securities and Common Equity Securities of Personal Property Asset Companies that are associated with personal property assets with investment performance that is not highly correlated with traditional market indexes, such as special situation transportation assets (e.g., railcars, airplanes and ships) and collectibles (e.g., antiques, wine and fine art).

Special Situation Transportation Assets Risks. The risks of special situation transportation assets include:

Cyclicality of Supply and Demand for Transportation Assets. The transportation asset leasing and sales industry has periodically experienced cycles of oversupply and undersupply of railcars, aircraft and ships. The oversupply of a specific type of transportation asset in the market is likely to depress the values of that type of transportation asset. The supply and demand of transportation assets is affected by various cyclical factors that are not under the Fund’s control, including: (i) passenger and cargo demand; (ii) commercial demand for certain types of transportation assets, (iii) fuel costs and general economic conditions affecting lessees’ operations; (iv) government regulation, including operating restrictions; (v) interest rates; (vi) the availability of credit; (vii) manufacturer production level; (viii) retirement and obsolescence of certain classes of transportation assets; (ix) re-introduction into service of transportation assets previously in storage; and (x) traffic control infrastructure constraints.

Risk of Decline in Value of Transportation Assets and Rental Values. In addition to factors linked to the railway, aviation and shipping industries, other factors that may affect the value of transportation assets, and thus of the Personal Property Asset Companies in which the Fund invests, include: (i) manufacturers merging or exiting the industry or ceasing to produce specific types of transportation asset; (ii) the particular maintenance and operating history of the transportation assets; (iii) the number of operators using that type of transportation asset; (iv) whether the railcar, aircraft or ship is subject to a lease; (v) any regulatory and legal requirements that must be satisfied before the transportation asset can be operated, sold or re-leased, (vi) compatibility of parts and layout of the transportation asset among operators of particular asset; and (vii) any renegotiation of a lease on less favorable terms.

Technological Risks. The availability for sale or lease of new, technologically advanced transportation assets and the imposition of stringent noise, emissions or environmental regulations may make certain types of transportation assets less desirable in the marketplace and therefore may adversely affect the owners’ ability to lease or sell such transportation assets. Consequently, the owner will have to lease or sell many of the transportation assets close to the end of their useful economic life. The owners’ ability to manage these technological risks by modifying or selling transportation assets will likely be limited.

Risks Relating to Leases of Transportation Assets. Owner/lessors of transportation assets will typically require lessees of assets to maintain customary and appropriate insurance. There can be no assurance that the lessees’ insurance will cover all types of claims that may be asserted against the owner, which could adversely affect the value of the Fund’s investment in the Personal Property Asset Company owning such transportation asset. Personal Property Asset Companies will be subject to credit risk of the lessees’ ability to the provisions of the lease of the transportation asset. The Personal Property Asset Company will need to release or sell transportation assets as the current leases expire in order to continue to generate revenues. The ability to re-lease or sell transportation assets will depend on general market and competitive conditions. Some of the competitors of the Personal Property Asset Company may have greater access to financial resources and may have greater operational flexibility. If the Personal Property Asset Company is not able to re-lease a transportation asset, it may need to attempt to sell the aircraft to provide funds for its investors, including the Fund.

Collectible Assets Risks. The risks of collectible assets include:

Valuation of Collectible Assets. The market for collectible assets as a financial investment is in the early stages of development. Collectible assets are typically bought and sold through auction houses, and estimates of prices of collectible assets at auction are imprecise. Accordingly, collectible assets are difficult to value.

Liquidity of Collectible Assets. There are relatively few auction houses in comparison to brokers and dealers of traditional financial assets. The ability to sell collectible assets is dependent on the demand for particular classes of collectible assets, which demand has been volatile and erratic in the past. There is no assurance that collectible assets can be sold within a particular timeframe or at the price at which such collectible assets are valued, which may impair the ability of the Fund to realize full value of Personal Property Asset Companies in the event of the need to liquidate such assets.

Authenticity of Collectible Assets. The value of collectible assets often depends on its rarity or scarcity, or of its attribution as the product of a particular artisan. Collectible Assets are subject to forgery and to the inabilities to assess the authenticity of the collectible asset, which may significantly impair the value of the collectible asset.

High Transaction and Related Costs. Collectible assets are typically bought and sold through auction houses, which typically charge commissions to the purchaser and to the seller which may exceed 20% of the sale price of the collectible asset. In addition, holding collectible assets entails storage and insurance costs, which may be substantial.

Private Securities Risk

The Income Securities and Common Equity Securities in which the Fund may invest include privately issued securities of both public and private companies. Private Securities have additional risk considerations than investments in comparable public investments. Whenever the Fund invests in companies that do not publicly report financial and other material information, it assumes a greater degree of investment risk and reliance upon the Sub-Adviser’s ability to obtain and evaluate applicable information concerning such companies’ creditworthiness and other investment considerations. Certain Private Securities may be illiquid. Because there is often no readily available trading market for Private Securities, the Fund may not be able to readily dispose of such investments at prices that approximate those at which the Fund could sell them if they were more widely traded. Private Securities are also more difficult to value. Valuation may require more research, and elements of judgment may play a greater role in the valuation of Private Securities as compared to public securities because there is less reliable objective data available. Private Securities that are debt securities generally are of below-investment grade quality, frequently are unrated and present many of the same risks as investing in below-investment grade public debt securities. Investing in private debt instruments is a highly specialized investment practice that depends more heavily on independent credit analysis than investments in other types of obligations.

Investment Funds Risk

As an alternative to holding investments directly, the Fund may also obtain investment exposure to Income Securities and Common Equity Securities by investing up to 30% of its total assets in Investment Funds. Investments in Investment Funds present certain special considerations and risks not present in making direct investments in Income Securities and Common Equity Securities. Investments in Investment Funds involve operating expenses and fees that are in addition to the expenses and fees borne by the Fund. Such expenses and fees attributable to the Fund’s investment in another Investment Fund are borne indirectly by Common Shareholders. Accordingly, investment in such entities involves expense and fee layering. Fees charged by other Investment Funds in which the Fund invests may be similar to the fees charged by the Fund and can include asset-based management fees and administrative fees payable to such entities’ advisers and managers, thus resulting in duplicative fees. To the extent management fees of Investment Funds are based on total gross assets, it may create an incentive for such entities’ managers to employ financial leverage, thereby adding additional expense and increasing volatility and risk. Fees payable to advisers and managers of Investment Funds may include performance-based incentive fees calculated as a percentage of profits. Such incentive fees directly reduce the return that otherwise would have been earned by investors over the applicable period. A performance-based fee arrangement may create incentives for an adviser or manager to take greater investment risks in the hope of earning a higher profit participation. Investments in Investment Funds frequently expose the Fund to an additional layer of financial leverage. Investments in Investment Funds expose the Fund to additional management risk. The success of the Fund’s investments in Investment Funds will depend in large part on the investment skills and implementation abilities of the advisers or managers of such entities. Decisions made by the advisers or managers of such entities may cause the Fund to incur losses or to miss profit opportunities. While the Sub-Adviser will seek to evaluate managers of Investment Funds and where possible independently evaluate the underlying assets, a substantial degree of reliance on such entities’ managers is nevertheless present with such investments.

Synthetic Investments Risk

As an alternative to holding investments directly, the Fund may also obtain investment exposure to Income Securities and Common Equity Securities through the use of customized derivative instruments (including swaps, options, forwards, notional principal contracts or other financial instruments) to replicate, modify or replace the economic attributes associated with an investment in Income Securities and Common Equity Securities (including interests in Investment Funds). The Fund may be exposed to certain additional risks to the extent the Sub-Adviser use derivatives as a means to synthetically implement the Fund’s investment strategies. If the Fund enters into a derivative instrument whereby it agrees to receive the return of a security or financial instrument or a basket of securities or financial instruments, it will typically contract to receive such returns for a predetermined period of time. During such period, the Fund may not have the ability to increase or decrease its exposure. In addition, such customized derivative instruments will likely be highly illiquid, and it is possible that the Fund will not be able to terminate such derivative instruments prior to their expiration date or that the penalties associated with such a termination might impact the Fund’s performance in a material adverse manner. Furthermore, derivative instruments typically contain provisions giving the counterparty the right to terminate the contract upon the occurrence of certain events. Such events may include a decline in the value of the reference securities and material violations of the terms of the contract or the portfolio guidelines as well as other events determined by the counterparty. If a termination were to occur, the Fund’s return could be adversely affected as it would lose the benefit of the indirect exposure to the reference securities and it may incur significant termination expenses.

In the event the Fund seeks to participate in Investment Funds (including Private Investment Funds) through the use of such synthetic derivative instruments, the Fund will not acquire any voting interests or other shareholder rights that would be acquired with a direct investment in the underlying Investment Fund. Accordingly, the Fund will not participate in matters submitted to a vote of the shareholders. In addition, the Fund may not receive all of the information and reports to shareholders that the Fund would receive with a direct investment in such Investment Fund. Further, the Fund will pay the counterparty to any such customized derivative instrument structuring fees and ongoing transaction fees, which will reduce the investment performance of the Fund. Finally, certain tax aspects of such customized derivative instruments are uncertain and a Common Shareholder’s return could be adversely affected by an adverse tax ruling.

Inflation/Deflation Risk

Inflation risk is the risk that the value of assets or income from investments will be worth less in the future as inflation decreases the value of money. As inflation increases, the real value of the Common Shares and distributions can decline. In addition, during any periods of rising inflation, the dividend rates or borrowing costs associated with the Fund’s use of Financial Leverage would likely increase, which would tend to further reduce returns to Common Shareholders. Deflation risk is the risk that prices throughout the economy decline over time—the opposite of inflation. Deflation may have an adverse affect on the creditworthiness of issuers and may make issuer default more likely, which may result in a decline in the value of the Fund’s portfolio.

Market Discount Risk

The Fund’s Common Shares have a limited trading history and have traded both at a premium and at a discount in relation to NAV. The Fund cannot predict whether the Common Shares will trade in the future at a premium or discount to NAV. The Fund’s Common Shares have recently traded at a premium to NAV per share, which may not be sustainable. If the Common Shares are trading at a premium to net asset value at the time you purchase Common Shares, the NAV per share of the Common Shares purchased will be less than the purchase price paid. Shares of closed-end investment companies frequently trade at a discount from NAV, but in some cases have traded above NAV. The risk of the Common Shares trading at a discount is a risk separate from the risk of a decline in the Fund’s NAV as a result of the Fund’s investment activities. The Fund’s NAV will be reduced immediately following an offering of the Common Shares due to the costs of such offering, which will be borne entirely by the Fund. The sale of Common Shares by the Fund (or the perception that such sales may occur) may have an adverse effect on prices of Common Shares in the secondary market. An increase in the number of Common Shares available may put downward pressure on the market price for Common Shares. The Fund may, from time to time, seek the consent of Common Shareholders to permit the issuance and sale by the Fund of Common Shares at a price below the Fund’s then current NAV, subject to certain conditions, and such sales of Common Shares at price below NAV, if any, may increase downward pressure on the market price for Common Shares. These sales, if any, also might make it more difficult for the Fund to sell additional Common Shares in the future at a time and price it deems appropriate.

Whether a Common Shareholder will realize a gain or loss upon the sale of Common Shares depends upon whether the market value of the Common Shares at the time of sale is above or below the price the Common Shareholder paid, taking into account transaction costs for the Common Shares, and is not directly dependent upon the Fund’s NAV. Because the market value of the Common Shares will be determined by factors such as the relative demand for and supply of the shares in the market, general market conditions and other factors outside the Fund’s control, the Fund cannot predict whether the Common Shares will trade at, below or above NAV, or at, below or above the public offering price for the Common Shares. Common Shares of the Fund are designed primarily for long-term investors; investors in Common Shares should not view the Fund as a vehicle for trading purposes.

Dilution Risk

The voting power of current Common Shareholders will be diluted to the extent that current Common Shareholders do not purchase Common Shares in any future offerings of Common Shares or do not purchase sufficient Common Shares to maintain their percentage interest. If the Fund is unable to invest the proceeds of such offering as intended, the Fund’s per Common Share distribution may decrease and the Fund may not participate in market advances to the same extent as if such proceeds were fully invested as planned. If the Fund sells Common Shares at a price below NAV pursuant to the consent of Common Shareholders, shareholders will experience a dilution of the aggregate NAV per Common Share because the sale price will be less than the Fund’s then-current NAV per Common Share. Similarly, were the expenses of the offering to exceed the amount by which the sale price exceeded the Fund’s then current NAV per Common Share, shareholders would experience a dilution of the aggregate NAV per Common Share. This dilution will be experienced by all shareholders, irrespective of whether they purchase Common Shares in any such offering.

Financial Leverage Risk

Although the use of Financial Leverage by the Fund may create an opportunity for increased after-tax total return for the Common Shares, it also results in additional risks and can magnify the effect of any losses. If the income and gains earned on securities purchased with Financial Leverage proceeds are greater than the cost of Financial Leverage, the Fund’s return will be greater than if Financial Leverage had not been used. Conversely, if the income or gains from the securities purchased with such proceeds does not cover the cost of Financial Leverage, the return to the Fund will be less than if Financial Leverage had not been used. There can be no assurance that a leveraging strategy will be implemented or that it will be successful during any period during which it is employed.

Financial Leverage involves risks and special considerations for shareholders, including the likelihood of greater volatility of net asset value and market price of and dividends on the Common Shares than a comparable portfolio without leverage; the risk that fluctuations in interest rates on Borrowings or in the dividend rates on any Preferred Shares that the Fund must pay will reduce the return to the Common Shareholders; and the effect of Financial Leverage in a declining market, which is likely to cause a greater decline in the net asset value of the Common Shares than if the Fund were not leveraged, which may result in a greater decline in the market price of the Common Shares.

It is also possible that the Fund will be required to sell assets, possibly at a loss, in order to redeem or meet payment obligations on any Financial Leverage. Such a sale would reduce the Fund’s net asset value and also make it difficult for the net asset value to recover. The Fund in its best judgment nevertheless may determine to continue to use Financial Leverage if it expects that the benefits to the Fund’s shareholders of maintaining the leveraged position will outweigh the current reduced return.

Because the fees received by the Investment Adviser and Sub-Adviser are based on the Managed Assets of the Fund (including the proceeds of any Financial Leverage), the Investment Adviser and Sub-Adviser have a financial incentive for the Fund to utilize Financial Leverage, which may create a conflict of interest between the Investment Adviser and the Sub-Adviser on the one hand and the Common Shareholders on the other. In order to manage this conflict of interest, the Board of Trustees will receive regular reports from the Investment Adviser and the Sub-Adviser regarding the Fund’s use of Financial Leverage and the effect of Financial Leverage on the management of the Fund’s portfolio and the performance of the Fund. Common Shareholders bear the portion of the investment advisory fee attributable to the assets purchased with the proceeds of Financial Leverage, which means that Common Shareholders effectively bear the entire advisory fee. In order to manage this conflict of interest, the Board of Trustees will receive regular reports from the Adviser regarding the Fund’s use of Financial Leverage and the effect of Financial Leverage on the management of the Fund’s portfolio and the performance of the Fund.

The Fund may enter into a swap or cap transaction to attempt to protect itself from increasing dividend or interest expenses resulting from increasing short-term interest rates. A decline in interest rates may result in a decline in net amounts receivable by the Fund from the counterparty under the swap or cap (or an increase in the net amounts payable by the Fund to the counterparty under the swap), which may result in a decline in the net asset value of the Fund.

Borrowings may subject the Fund to covenants in credit agreements relating to asset coverage and portfolio composition requirements. Borrowings by the Fund also may subject the Fund to certain restrictions on investments imposed by guidelines of one or more rating agencies, which may issue ratings for such Indebtedness. Such guidelines may impose asset coverage or portfolio composition requirements that are more stringent than those imposed by the 1940 Act.

Reverse repurchase agreements involve the risks that the interest income earned on the investment of the proceeds will be less than the interest expense and Fund expenses associated with the repurchase agreement, that the market value of the securities sold by the Fund may decline below the price at which the Fund is obligated to repurchase such securities and that the securities may not be returned to the Fund. There is no assurance that reverse repurchase agreements can be successfully employed. Dollar roll transactions involve the risk that the market value of the securities the Fund is required to purchase may decline below the agreed upon repurchase price of those securities. Successful use of dollar rolls may depend upon the Adviser’s ability to correctly predict interest rates and prepayments. There is no assurance that dollar rolls can be successfully employed. In connection with reverse repurchase agreements and dollar rolls, the Fund will also be subject to counterparty risk with respect to the purchaser of the securities. If the broker/dealer to whom the Fund sells securities becomes insolvent, the Fund’s right to purchase or repurchase securities may be restricted.

The Fund may engage in certain derivatives transactions that have economic characteristics similar to leverage. To the extent the terms of any such transaction obligate the Fund to make payments, the Fund intends to earmark or segregate cash or liquid securities in an amount at least equal to the current value of the amount then payable by the Fund under the terms of such transaction or otherwise cover such transaction in accordance with applicable interpretations of the staff of the SEC. To the extent the terms of any such transaction obligate the Fund to deliver particular securities to extinguish the Fund’s obligations under such transactions, the Fund may “cover” its obligations under such transaction by either (i) owning the securities or collateral underlying such transactions or (ii) having an absolute and immediate right to acquire such securities or collateral without additional cash consideration (or, if additional cash consideration is required, having earmarked or segregated cash or liquid securities). Securities so segregated or designated as “cover” will be unavailable for sale by the Adviser (unless replaced by other securities qualifying for segregation or cover requirements), which may adversely affect the ability of the Fund to pursue its investment objective.

Recent economic and market events have contributed to severe market volatility and caused severe liquidity strains in the credit markets. If dislocations in the credit markets continue, the Fund’s leverage costs may increase and there is a risk that the Fund may not be able to renew or replace existing leverage on favorable terms or at all. If the cost of leverage is no longer favorable, or if the Fund is otherwise required to reduce its leverage, the Fund may not be able to maintain distributions on Common Shares at historical levels and Common Shareholders will bear any costs associated with selling portfolio securities.

Derivative Transactions Risks

The Fund may engage in various derivatives transactions for hedging and risk management purposes, to facilitate portfolio management and to earn income or enhance total return. The use of derivatives transactions to earn income or enhance total return may be particularly speculative. Derivatives transactions involve risks. There may be imperfect correlation between the value of derivative instruments and the underlying assets. Derivatives transactions may be subject to risks associated with the possible default of the other party to the transaction. Derivative instruments may be illiquid. Certain derivatives transactions may have economic characteristics similar to leverage, in that relatively small market movements may result in large changes in the value of an investment. Certain derivatives transactions that involve leverage can result in losses that greatly exceed the amount originally invested. Furthermore, the Fund’s ability to successfully use derivatives transactions depends on the Adviser’s ability to predict pertinent securities prices, interest rates, currency exchange rates and other economic factors, which cannot be assured. The use of derivatives transactions may result in losses greater than if they had not been used, may require the Fund to sell or purchase portfolio securities at inopportune times or for prices other than current market values, may limit the amount of appreciation the Fund can realize on an investment or may cause the Fund to hold a security that it might otherwise sell. Derivatives transactions involve risks of mispricing or improper valuation. The documentation governing a derivative instrument or transaction may be unfavorable or ambiguous. Derivatives transactions may involve commissions and other costs, which may increase the Fund’s expenses and reduce its return. Various legislative and regulatory initiatives may impact the availability, liquidity and cost of derivative instruments, limit or restrict the ability of the Fund to use certain derivative instruments or transact with certain counterparties as a part of its investment strategy, increase the costs of using derivative instruments or make derivative instruments less effective. In connection with certain derivatives transactions, the Fund may be required to segregate liquid assets or otherwise cover such transactions. The Fund may earn a lower return on its portfolio than it might otherwise earn if it did not have to segregate assets in respect of, or otherwise cover, its derivatives transactions positions. Segregating assets and covering positions will not limit or offset losses on related positions.

Swap Risk

The Fund may enter into swap transactions, including credit default swaps, total return swaps, index swaps, currency swaps, commodity swaps and interest rate swaps, as well as options thereon, and may purchase or sell interest rate caps, floors and collars. If the Adviser is incorrect in its forecasts of market values, interest rates or currency exchange rates, the investment performance of the Fund may be less favorable than it would have been if these investment techniques were not used. Such transactions are subject to market risk, risk of default by the other party to the transaction and risk of imperfect correlation between the value of such instruments and the underlying assets and may involve commissions or other costs. Swaps generally do not involve the delivery of securities, other underlying assets or principal. Accordingly, the risk of loss with respect to swaps generally is limited to the net amount of payments that the Fund is contractually obligated to make, or in the case of the other party to a swap defaulting, the net amount of payments that the Fund is contractually entitled to receive. Total return swaps may effectively add leverage to the Fund’s portfolio because the Fund would be subject to investment exposure on the full notional amount of the swap.

When the Fund acts as a seller of a credit default swap agreement with respect to a debt security, it is subject to the risk that an adverse credit event may occur with respect to the debt security and the Fund may be required to pay the buyer the full notional value of the debt security under the swap net of any amounts owed to the Fund by the buyer under the swap (such as the buyer’s obligation to deliver the debt security to the Fund). As a result, the Fund bears the entire risk of loss due to a decline in value of a referenced debt security on a credit default swap it has sold if there is a credit event with respect to the security. If the Fund is a buyer of a credit default swap and no credit event occurs, the Fund may recover nothing if the swap is held through its termination date. However, if a credit event occurs, the Fund generally may elect to receive the full notional value of the swap in exchange for an equal face amount of deliverable obligations of the reference entity whose value may have significantly decreased.

Counterparty Risk

The Fund will be subject to credit risk with respect to the counterparties to the derivative contracts entered into by the Fund. If a counterparty becomes bankrupt or otherwise fails to perform its obligations under a derivative contract, the Fund may experience significant delays in obtaining any recovery under the derivative contract in bankruptcy or other reorganization proceeding. The Fund may obtain only a limited recovery or may obtain no recovery in such circumstances. If a counterparty’s credit becomes significantly impaired, multiple requests for collateral posting in a short period of time could increase the risk that the Fund may not receive adequate collateral.

Portfolio Turnover Risk

The Fund’s annual portfolio turnover rate may vary greatly from year to year. Portfolio turnover rate is not considered a limiting factor in the execution of investment decisions for the Fund. A higher portfolio turnover rate results in correspondingly greater brokerage commissions and other transactional expenses that are borne by the Fund. High portfolio turnover may result in an increased realization of net short-term capital gains by the Fund which, when distributed to Common Shareholders, will be taxable as ordinary income. Additionally, in a declining market, portfolio turnover may create realized capital losses.

Recent Market Developments Risk

Global and domestic financial markets have experienced periods of severe turmoil. The debt and equity capital markets in the United States have been negatively impacted by significant write-offs in the financial services sector relating to sub-prime mortgages and the re-pricing of credit risk, among other things. These events, along with the deterioration of the housing market, the failure of major financial institutions and the resulting United States federal government actions led to worsening general economic conditions, which materially and adversely impacted the broader financial and credit markets and reduced the availability of debt and equity capital for the market as a whole and financial firms in particular. Such market conditions may increase the volatility of the value of securities owned by the Fund, may make it more difficult for the Fund to accurately value its securities or to sell its securities on a timely basis and may adversely affect the ability of the Fund to borrow for investment purposes and increase the cost of such borrowings, which would reduce returns to the holders of Common Shares. These developments adversely affected the broader economy, and may continue to do so, which in turn may adversely affect issuers of securities owned by the Fund. Such developments could, in turn, reduce the value of securities owned by the Fund and adversely affect the net asset value of the Fund’s Common Shares.

Instability in the financial markets led the U.S. Government and other governments around the world to take a number of actions designed to support certain financial institutions and segments of the financial markets that experienced extreme volatility, and in some cases a lack of liquidity. The long-term implications of government ownership and disposition of distressed assets and interests in financial institutions are unclear.

Recently, markets have witnessed more stabilized economic activity as expectations for an economic recovery increased. However, risks to a robust resumption of growth persist. A return to unfavorable economic conditions or sustained economic slowdown could adversely impact the Fund’s portfolio. Financial market conditions, as well as various social and political tensions in the United States and around the world, have contributed to increased market volatility and may have long-term effects on the U.S. and worldwide financial markets and cause further economic uncertainties or deterioration in the United States and worldwide. The Adviser does not know how long the financial markets will continue to be affected by these events and cannot predict the effects of these or similar events in the future on the U.S. and global economies and securities markets in the Fund’s portfolio. The Adviser intends to monitor developments and seek to manage the Fund’s portfolio in a manner consistent with achieving the Fund’s investment objective, but there can be no assurance that they will be successful in doing so.

U.S. Government Securities Risk

U.S. Government securities historically have not involved the credit risks associated with investments in other types of debt securities, although, as a result, the yields available from U.S. Government debt securities are generally lower than the yields available from other securities. Like other debt securities, however, the values of U.S. Government securities change as interest rates fluctuate. On August 5, 2011, S&P lowered its long-term sovereign credit rating on the U.S. to “AA+” from “AAA.” Any further downgrades of the U.S. credit rating could increase volatility in both stock and bond markets, result in higher interest rates and higher Treasury yields and increase the costs of all kinds of debt.

Risk Associated with Government Intervention in Financial Markets

The instability in the financial markets discussed above has led the U.S. Government to take a number of unprecedented actions designed to support certain financial institutions and segments of the financial markets that have experienced extreme volatility, and in some cases a lack of liquidity. Governments or their agencies have acquired distressed assets from financial institutions and ownership interests in those institutions. The implications of government ownership and disposition of these assets are unclear, and such a program may have positive or negative effects on the liquidity, valuation and performance of the Fund’s portfolio holdings. Federal, state, and other governments, their regulatory agencies, or self regulatory organizations may take actions that affect the regulation of the instruments in which the Fund invests, or the issuers of such instruments.

Legislation and Regulation Risk

The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the “Dodd-Frank Act”), which was signed into law in July 2010, is has resulted in a significant revision of the U.S. financial regulatory framework. The Dodd-Frank Act covers a broad range of topics, including, among many others, a reorganization of federal financial regulators; the creation of a process designed to ensure financial system stability and the resolution of potentially insolvent financial firms; the enactment of new rules for derivatives trading; the creation of a consumer financial protection watchdog; the registration and regulation of managers of private funds; the regulation of rating agencies; and the enactment of new federal requirements for residential mortgage loans. The regulation of various types of derivative instruments pursuant to the Dodd-Frank Act may adversely affect issuers of securities in which the Fund invests that utilize derivatives strategies for hedging or other purposes. The ultimate impact of the Dodd-Frank Act, and any resulting regulation, is not yet certain and issuers of securities in which the Fund invests may also be affected by the new legislation and regulation in ways that are currently unknown and unforeseeable.

In connection with an ongoing review by the SEC and its staff of the regulation of investment companies’ use of derivatives, on August 31, 2011, the SEC issued a concept release to seek public comment on a wide range of issues raised by the use of derivatives by investment companies. The SEC noted that it intends to consider the comments to help determine whether regulatory initiatives or guidance are needed to improve the current regulatory regime for investment companies and, if so, the nature of any such initiatives or guidance. While the nature of any such regulations is uncertain at this time, it is possible that such regulations could limit the implementation of the Fund’s use of derivatives, which could have an adverse impact on the Fund. Neither the Adviser nor the Sub-Adviser can predict the effects of these regulations on the Fund’s portfolio. The Adviser and the Sub-Adviser intend to monitor developments and seek to manage the Fund’s portfolio in a manner consistent with achieving the Fund’s investment objective, but there can be no assurance that they will be successful in doing so.

At any time after the date of this Prospectus, legislation may be enacted that could negatively affect the assets of the Fund or the issuers of such assets. Changing approaches to regulation may have a negative impact on the Fund entities in which the Fund invests. Legislation or regulation may also change the way in which the Fund itself is regulated. There can be no assurance that future legislation, regulation or deregulation will not have a material adverse effect on the Fund or will not impair the ability of the Fund to achieve its investment objective.

When-Issued and Delayed Delivery Transactions Risk

Securities purchased on a when-issued or delayed delivery basis may expose the Fund to counterparty risk of default as well as the risk that securities may experience fluctuations in value prior to their actual delivery. The Fund generally will not accrue income with respect to a when-issued or delayed delivery security prior to its stated delivery date. Purchasing securities on a when-issued or delayed delivery basis can involve the additional risk that the price or yield available in the market when the delivery takes place may not be as favorable as that obtained in the transaction itself.

Short Sales Risk

The Fund may make short sales of securities. A short sale is a transaction in which the Fund sells a security it does not own. If the price of the security sold short increases between the time of the short sale and the time the Fund replaces the borrowed security, the Fund will incur a loss; conversely, if the price declines, the Fund will realize a capital gain. Any gain will be decreased, and any loss will be increased, by the transaction costs incurred by the Fund, including the costs associated with providing collateral to the broker-dealer (usually cash and liquid securities) and the maintenance of collateral with its custodian. Although the Fund’s gain is limited to the price at which it sold the security short, its potential loss is theoretically unlimited. The Fund may have to pay a premium to borrow the securities and must pay any dividends or interest payable on the securities until they are replaced, which will be expenses of the Fund.

Repurchase Agreement Risk

A repurchase agreement exposes the Fund to the risk that the party that sells the security may default on its obligation to repurchase it. The Fund may lose money because it cannot sell the security at the agreed-upon time and price or the security loses value before it can be sold.

Securities Lending Risk

The Fund may lend its portfolio securities to banks or dealers which meet the creditworthiness standards established by the Board of Trustees. Securities lending is subject to the risk that loaned securities may not be available to the Fund on a timely basis and the Fund may therefore lose the opportunity to sell the securities at a desirable price. Any loss in the market price of securities loaned by the Fund that occurs during the term of the loan would be borne by the Fund and would adversely affect the Fund’s performance. Also, there may be delays in recovery, or no recovery, of securities loaned or even a loss of rights in the collateral should the borrower of the securities fail financially while the loan is outstanding.

Risk of Failure to Qualify as a RIC

To qualify for the favorable U.S. federal income tax treatment generally accorded to RICs, the Fund must, among other things, derive in each taxable year at least 90% of its gross income from certain prescribed sources, meet certain asset diversification tests and distribute for each taxable year at least 90% of its “investment company taxable income” (generally, ordinary income plus the excess, if any, of net short-term capital gain over net long-term capital loss). If for any taxable year the Fund does not qualify as a RIC, all of its taxable income for that year (including its net capital gain) would be subject to tax at regular corporate rates without any deduction for distributions to shareholders, and such distributions would be taxable as ordinary dividends to the extent of the Fund’s current and accumulated earnings and profits.

Potential Conflicts of Interest Risk

The Adviser and its affiliates provide a wide array of portfolio management and other asset management services to a mix of clients and may engage in ordinary course activities in which their interests or those of their clients may compete or conflict with those of the Fund. The Adviser and its affiliates may provide investment management services to other funds that follow investment objectives similar to those of the Fund. In certain circumstances, and subject to its fiduciary obligations under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940 (the “Advisers Act”), the Adviser may have to allocate a limited investment opportunity among its clients. The Adviser and its affiliates have adopted policies and procedures designed to address such and other potential conflicts of interests.

Government Investment Programs Risks

In response to the financial crises affecting the banking system and the financial markets, the United States government, the Treasury, the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System and other governmental and regulatory bodies may take action in an attempt to stabilize the financial markets. Such programs may be sponsored, established or operated by U.S. or non-U.S. governments from time to time. It is unclear what effect these programs, and their eventual termination, may have on the markets for credit securities in which the fund may invest over the near- and long-term. Such programs may have positive or negative effects on the liquidity, valuation and performance of the Fund’s portfolio holdings.

The Fund may seek to participate in such government programs from time to time. Participation in such programs may expose the Fund to additional risks and may limit the Fund’s ability to engage in certain of the investment strategies or transactions described in this Prospectus or in the SAI. There can be no assurance that the Fund will be able to participate in any such program.

Market Disruption and Geopolitical Risk

Instability in the Middle East and Africa and terrorist attacks in the United States and around the world have contributed to increased market volatility, may have long-term effects on the U.S. and worldwide financial markets and may cause further economic uncertainties or deterioration in the United States and worldwide. The Adviser and Sub-Adviser do not know how long the financial markets will continue to be affected by these events and cannot predict the effects of these or similar events in the future on the U.S. and global economies and securities markets.

Anti-Takeover Provisions Risk

The Fund’s Agreement and Declaration of Trust and Bylaws (collectively the “Governing Documents”) include provisions that could limit the ability of other entities or persons to acquire control of the Fund or convert the Fund to an open-end fund. These provisions could have the effect of depriving the Common Shareholders of opportunities to sell their Common Shares at a premium over the then-current market price of the Common Shares.

 

Guggenheim Investments represents the investment management businesses of Guggenheim Partners, LLC ("Guggenheim"). Guggenheim Funds Distributors, LLC is an affiliate of Guggenheim.

2014 Guggenheim Investments. All Rights Reserved.
• Not FDIC Insured • No Bank Guarantee • May Lose Value